Zojirushi Blog

Mom’s Home Cooking: Japanese Hot Pot (鍋 / Nabe)

Nabemono, or Nabe for short, is a hearty Japanese dish that was traditionally prepared in clay pots. “Nabe” actually translates to “cooking pot,” and “mono” translates to “thing.” This popular dish can be prepared in many different ways depending on which region of Japan you’re in, but is typically made with vegetables, flavored broth, mushrooms, and meat. As a staple dish that reminds of mom’s cooking, we know that most moms will add a festive touch by preparing flavorful dipping sauces and colorful accoutrements. Nabe is a delicious dish that brings families and friends together, as it is a social event where the meal is cooked right at the table and enjoyed collectively.

History of Nabe

Nabemono is said to be as old as Japanese earthenware, dating back to a thousand years ago. It was traditionally enjoyed during the fall and winter seasons over a sunken fireplace, or “irori,” which was typically built at the center of Japanese homes.

As time progressed, nabe was moved over to charcoal stoves, and became portable with the invention of the “shichirin” clay stove. Today, nabe can be made at any time of year thanks to modern portable stoves.

Preparing nabe can be ceremonial as well — the family nominates a “nabe bugyo,” who is in charge of deciding which ingredients are cooked and in which order.

Types of Nabe

There is a dizzying number of ways nabe is enjoyed throughout Japan. Depending on the region, exotic ingredients such as pufferfish and wild boar can be used! Here are some of the most common styles of nabe you can keep an eye out for the next time you’re looking to enjoy Japanese hot pot:

  • Yose-nabe is the most common and type of nabe, made with a mix of vegetables, mushrooms, meats and seafoods. Often, raw eggs and cooked rice are added to the condensed broth to end the meal with a thick rice porridge.
  • Sukiyaki features thinly sliced beef or pork simmered with vegetables in a mix of soy sauce, mirin, sugar, and water. Ingredients are usually dipped in raw egg before eating.
  • Shabu Shabu often has a lightly flavored broth, made with kombu and dashi. Vegetables are added to the pot, and meat is added last. The thinly sliced meat only needs a few moments to cook before it is removed and dipped in a ponzu or sesame sauce before enjoying
  • Oden broth is often simmered for hours, and includes ingredients such as fish cakes and potatoes. You can find oden ready-to-eat at many Japanese convenience stores.
  • Chanko is a type of Japanese nabe that is eaten in huge quantities by sumo wrestlers as they attempt to gain or maintain their fighting weights in Japan. The broth is usually made from dashi and/or chicken, sake, and mirin. Fun fact: sumo wrestlers will not use beef and pork for soup base because being on four legs represents a loss in sumo wrestling.

How to Enjoy Nabe

The great thing about nabe is that you can truly make it your own. There are some basic guidelines, however, that can help make your nabe experience more enjoyable (and tasty!). Here are some of our favorite tips on how to enjoy nabe:

  • Set the table. Each person should have a small personal bowl in which they can ladle their ingredients into. Additionally, each person should have personal condiments and dipping sauces nearby for when the ingredients are ready to eat.
  • Prep the sauces. Depending on what kind of nabe you are having, you can have different condiments such as ponzu, grated daikon, yuzu kosho, and mustard. Feel free to mix and match the sauces, or even try something completely new!
  • Make the most of it. Near the end of the meal, make the most of your leftover broth by adding rice or noodles to it. Or, save the broth for the next day and simply add water to dilute and enjoy with rice or noodles.

Make Nabe at Home

Zojirushi’s Vegetarian Miso Nabe

Ready to show off your nabe-making chops to your loved ones? Zojirushi has nabe recipes that you can make in the comfort of your own home using your Gourmet d’Expert® Electric Skillet EP-PBC10 or EP-RAC50. Which one will you be making tonight?

Let us know if you try (or make) any of these dishes by tagging Zojirushi on your photos with #zojirushi on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram!

Mother’s Home Cooking: 炊き込みご飯 (Takikomi-gohan)

Today we’re taking a trip to mom’s kitchen to learn about Takikomi-Gohan, or seasoned Japanese mixed rice. This savory, gluten-free recipe is very popular in Japan and uses seasonal ingredients to celebrate the country’s many micro-seasons and local vegetables. Not only is it savory and comforting, but it’s very healthy and so simple to make! After getting all your ingredients together, you add everything to your rice cooker and press “start.” For busy mothers, this dish is a beloved secret for a quick and delicious dinner for any night of the week, and a fan-favorite for children and adults alike.

Where does it come from?

At its core, Takikomi-gohan comes from humble beginnings and has been a vital part of Japanese culture for many centuries. Takikomi-gohan was created during the Nara period, around 710-784 AD. During this time, Japanese people had a lot of difficulty growing and harvesting rice to feed everybody, so they mixed rice with millet. Then, people started mixing this rice and millet combination with a variety of vegetables, such as weeds and yams. This early version of Takikomi-gohan is called Katemeshi.

Later on, during the Muromachi period, Japanese people made a similar dish to Katemeshi called Kawarimeshi. Kawarimeshi is similar to Katemeshi, but uses quality ingredients such as barley, beans, and vegetables, as well as more seasonal ingredients to maximize flavor.

Today, there are several varieties of Takikomi-gohan depending on where you go in Japan. In the Kansai region, it is called Kayaku-gohan, and in Okinawa it is called Jushi. It can also be called Gomoku Gohan. Another relative to this dish, Maze Gohan which mixes ingredients such as vegetables and protein with rice after the rice is cooked, rather than with the rice as it’s cooking.                                                                                         

Star Ingredients

  • Because this dish relies on seasonal ingredients, the star ingredients will depend on when you’re making this dish! Generally, the ideal makeup of this dish consists of vegetables, proteins, dashi, soy sauce, mirin, sugar, and short-grain rice.
  • This dish is especially popular during the fall, a very popular ingredient to include is shiitake mushrooms.
  • Other ingredients to consider include bamboo shoots, chestnuts, hijiki seaweed, peas, and sweet potatoes.

Rice Cooker Tips & Tricks

  • If you have it on your rice cooker, use the “mixed’ setting since it will adjust the menu setting for the added ingredients and condiments.
  • Add condiments BEFORE measuring the water, then add water to the corresponding water line. Then mix well from the bottom of the pan.
  • Add additional ingredients like veggies and proteins on top of the rice, and don’t mix in with rice.
  • After cooking has completed, open the lid and turn the rice and ingredients to mix so that they will spread evenly. It also allows any excess moisture to evaporate to prevent making the rice soggy.
  • ​The recommended amount of ingredients should be about 30-50% of the volume of rice.

  • Here’s a vegan version by Okonomi Kitchen that has us drooling. It features lots of veggies, mushrooms, and tofu for protein.
  • We have a classic Zojirushi recipe that you can make 100% in your rice cooker, and is a traditional take on this beloved dish.

Have you tried Takikomi-gohan before? What are your favorite ingredients to add to this dish? Let us know if you try (or make) Takikomi-gohan by tagging Zojirushi on your photos with #zojirushi on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram!

Mother’s Home Cooking: Nikujaga, Japanese Meat and Potato Stew (肉じゃが)

Today, we visit mom’s kitchen for one of the most famous home-cooked meals in Japan — Nikujaga (sometimes spelled Nikujyaga). This savory beef stew is the epitome of comfort in a bowl, with large chunks of potato, noodles, and tender beef in a warm, umami-filled soup. It is simple, nutritious, filling, and a true staple in any Japanese household. Is your mouth watering yet? Ours, too! Below, we’ll dive into the history of this dish and how to make this delicious meal for yourself.

Nikujaga’s Birthplace

Nikujaga has deep roots. It was invented in the late 19th century by chefs in the Imperial Japanese Navy as a Japanese version of a British stew. This type of Japanese adaption of Western cuisine even has its own word – “yoshoku,” and nikujaga is one of the first recorded examples of Japanese “fusion” food.

The story goes that the Naval admiral Tōgō Heihachirō wanted his naval cooks to create a version of the beef stews served in the British Royal Navy, but because Western ingredients such as demi-glace were not familiar to the chefs, they made their own rendition through soy sauce and sugar. It worked! Apparently, you can still find the original recipe in Japan’s “Navy Kitchen Textbook.”

This dish was lauded for its simplicity, soothing flavor, and the high energy it fueled for the hardworking sailors. However, nikujaga was mainly a dish cooked at home by mothers until the 1970s, when there was a renewed interest in the dish and popularity skyrocketed. Now, nikujaga fans all over the world enjoy the dish for all occasions, and you can find this dish in many Japanese restaurants as well.

Nikujaga’s Ingredients, Explained

Nikujaga directly translates to “meat and potatoes. “Niku” means meat and “jagaimo” means potatoes. Easy, right? The recipe is even easier. There are four main components to the dish that bring this stew to life. Here are the main ingredients broken down:

  • Beef
    In the spirit of a true stew, you use what you have. The beef for Nikujaga can be from a variety of cuts, and some people like them chunky, and others like them thinly sliced. Just make sure to use a cut with some fat on it to keep the meat tender and juicy. Fun fact: pork is more common for this dish in eastern Japan!
  • Potatoes
    The second star of this show is the potatoes, cut in large, bite-size chunks. Other common vegetables to include are carrots and onions and colorful greens such as snow peas. You can always toss in whatever vegetables you like. The more, the merrier!
  • Noodles
    There are different types of noodles that can be used for this dish, Shirataki being the classic take. These noodles are low in calories and are often called the “miracle noodle” for their nutritional value and carb-free ingredients. You can find these at most Japanese or Asian grocery stores or even order them online!
  • Broth
    The base for Nikujaga is typically dashi, which is made from water, kombu (dried kelp), and bonito fish flakes. It has a salty and umami-packed flavor. However, this dish can also be cooked in beef stock or water. The broth is then seasoned with soy sauce, sugar, and mirin, another common combination in Japanese cooking.

Tips for Enjoying Nikujaga

  • Traditionally, this dish is served with a side of white rice and miso soup. Get those prepped as you cook this stew if you want to enjoy the full experience.
  • This dish absorbs more flavor and tastes better with time, so you can enjoy it for days. Score!
  • Have fun with it! As you make this stew, make sure to taste the broth and add in additional ingredients to shake up the flavor. You can add anything from garlic, ginger, green onions, and even tomatoes.

We have a pretty traditional Zojirushi Nikujaga recipe available on our website that you can make easily in a saucepan. Try it out, and let us know what you think!

How did your nikujaga come out? Make sure to tag Zojirushi on your photos with #zojirushi on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram to let us know how you did!

Mom’s Cooking Blog: Ginger Pork Stir-Fry (生姜焼きShogayaki)

Today, we’re visiting mom’s kitchen to indulge in a Japanese classic – Shogayaki, or Ginger Pork. The signature ginger and soy sauce marinade transforms the thin tender pork slices into a mouthwatering entrée, served crispy over rice and cabbage. The best part? After you marinate the pork, it’s usually ready in a snap, around 10 minutes or less. It’s most popular as a lunchtime bento box or teishoku set, which includes rice, miso soup, and pickles. But in mom’s kitchen, this simple dish makes for an excellent flavor-packed meal any time of day!

Shogayaki Origins

In Japanese, ginger is shoga (生姜) and “yaki” (焼き) means grill. In other words, it directly translates to “grilled with ginger.” If you mention “shogayaki” in any place in Japan, most people will assume you’re referring to pork shogayaki, but other variations with beef also exist.

No Recipes states that this dish originated at a Tonkatsu restaurant (another famous pork dish) about 70 years ago in the city of Ginza, where the chef decided to marinade his pork in a simple ginger sauce before pan frying it golden brown.

Since then, the dish has taken off and quickly become a Japanese home staple and is the most famous pork dish in the country second only to Tonkatsu.

Breaking Down the Ingredients

Ginger

The star of this dish is most certainly ginger, where the ingredient creates a distinct warm spice and mouthwatering aroma. Ginger contains an enzyme called Zingibain, which breaks down the pork’s protein, making the meat more tender over time. Ginger also contains antimicrobial compounds that fight off the growth of pathogens, which means it keeps your meat fresher for longer, sometimes up to a week! There are also many additional health benefits from ginger alone, from reducing inflammation, protecting the immune system, and some even say that fights fatigue caused by the hot and humid weather during Japanese summers!

Soy Sauce

Soy sauce is the backbone of this dish as well as for many other sauces in Japanese cuisine. By adding saltiness to the sauce, it brings out the meat’s peak flavors, and when combined with the other ingredients it adds to the signature “umami” of this dish.

Sake

Sake may be a neutral-flavored ingredient but plays an essential role in the marinade. On top of gently adding depth and flavor to the umami of the dish, the alcohol in the sake also helps break down and tenderize the meat and also cuts any unpleasant odors from the pork.

Mirin

Mirin is a subtly sweet Japanese rice wine with a lower alcohol content than sake. It has a syrupy texture that adds sweetness and thickness to the sauce, rounding out the saltiness from the soy sauce and adding body to the sauce.

Pork

Various cuts of pork can be used for this dish, but the most popular include leg, sirloin, or shoulder. Others will even use thicker cuts, like pork collar. It’s all up to you and what meats you have available or prefer.

There are a couple of ways to prep the pork as well- either by hand-cutting it or using a meat slicer to slice it into super-thin pieces.

Pro tip: frozen meat is much easier to slice into thin pieces

When it comes to marinating the pork, some say to leave the pork for at least an hour, and others will say to let it sit overnight. Others will even say to skip the marinating process altogether and send it straight to the pan! Either way, the pork in ginger will keep for a few days, so you can continue to enjoy or share this delicious dish however you like.

Cabbage

You will almost always see a large bed of cabbage accompanying a dish of Shogayaki. It’s a simple palate cleanser that mellows out the ginger sauce, making each bite after the next equally delicious. Some will add a dressing, but traditionalists will skip it because the ginger sauce from the pork compliments the cabbage as is.

Optional

There are many variations to making this dish, and of course, we recommend that you make it the way that you enjoy it the most. Some of the most common additions to this recipe will be sliced onion, garlic, and sugar, and a few other suggestions call for green onion, sesame oil, tomato sauce, or corn starch.

Shogayaki, Zojirushi style

Are you ready to whip up some Shogayaki goodness yourself? Our recipe has a few Zojirushi twists to make this dish extra special. For example, our recipe calls for boneless pork chops and corn starch, and it also instructs you to add the ginger juice at the very end.

This recipe was developed for any of our Gourmet Sizzler® Electric Griddles and when it’s hot and ready, the pork should cook fully within a few minutes. Enjoy!

How do you make your ginger pork? Did you add any secret ingredients to make yours pop?

Let us know by sharing your story on social by tagging #Zojirushi on your photos with #zojirushi on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram!

Mom’s Home Cooked 唐揚げ (Karaage): Japanese Fried Chicken

Japanese Fried Chicken (karaage) is one of the nation’s most celebrated dishes, found in restaurants, markets, and convenience stores all over the country.

Karaage fanatics will say that this is the best fried chicken in the world, and their love for the dish most likely started right at home, prepared by mom. Below, we’ll dive into why this crispy-on-the-outside, juicy-on-the-inside, bite-sized fried chicken is the ultimate comfort food and how to prepare this dish right in your own kitchen.

Karaage’s History

Karaage (pronounced kara-ah-gay) historically refers to any dish that is coated in potato starch and deep-fried without seasoning. Because karaage refers to the method of preparing a fried dish, it can also refer to fried fish and vegetables. However, it is most commonly made with chicken- specifically boneless chicken thighs.

The word “karaage” translates to “Chinese Fried,” so it is believed this method was learned from the Chinese around 300 years ago and then adapted to Japanese cuisine. However, the dish really took off when it was popularized in the 1920s after WWII, when chicken was scarce.

Tatsutaage is a very similar dish that is used interchangeably with Karaage. Technically, what we know as Japanese fried chicken is in fact Tatsutaage. Why? Karaage refers to food only coated in starch and fried, while Tatsutaage refers to food being marinated, coated in starch, and fried. While all Karaage is Tatsutaage, not all Tatsutaage is Karaage. Tatsutaage is strictly meant to be made with soy sauce, while Karaage can be made with a variety of ingredients.

Tips and Tricks

Karaage is uniquely Japanese because it is marinated in soy sauce, sake and ginger. After the sauce sets, the chicken is coated with potato starch and fried until golden brown and crispy. To make the most flavorful karaage at home, traditionally or with your own twist, follow the tips and tricks below:

Chicken

  • Use fresh chicken over frozen
  • Keep the chicken skin on for a more crunchy texture
  • Cut the chicken into smaller pieces for crispier chicken, slightly larger for juicier chicken
  • Poke holes in the chicken with a fork for extra crispiness

Marinade

  • Marinate for at least 20 minutes
  • Add garlic for extra flavor and kick
  • No Recipes likes to marinate in salt brine, curry powder, chili powder, or even fish sauce
  • Just One Cookbook also suggests marinating in sesame oil, mirin, oyster sauce, egg yolk, or Japanese mayonnaise

Coating

  • For the starch, some will use a 50:50 ratio of potato starch and rice flour, but The Chopstick Chronicles swears that 100% potato starch results in a crispier chicken
  • You can also use flour or corn starch
  • For convenience, you can also use ready-made fry mixes sold at your local market

Frying

  • You can fry in an electric deep fryer or a pan
  • Fry twice for extra crispiness, fry once for extra juiciness. If frying twice, fry the first time at a lower temperature and then fry at a higher temperature the second time to lock in crispiness
  • Expert fryers will be able to know when the chicken is ready by looking at the bubble sizes, but it is recommended to use a thermometer to read the heat to know when it is ready (160 °F internal temp)

Enjoy

  • Enjoy with a generous squeeze of lemon and a side salad or rice if you’re preparing a bento box
  • A popular dipping sauce is Japanese Kewpie Mayonnaise
  • An extra perk is that it is delicious served hot and cold

From the Zojirushi Kitchen: Are you ready to make your own karaage? Here is our recipe with our Zojirushi twist. We add dark sesame oil and suggest you marinate the chicken in a plastic bag to lock in all of the flavor.

Want to learn about another karaage variation? Last year, in our B-kyu Gurume series, we explored Tebasaki Karaage from Nagoya. Take a look at that piece on our blog to learn more about a different variation on this fan-favorite dish – that’s more like a Japanese style of chicken wings instead of fried chicken.

How did your karaage come out? Do you have any special recipes or tips to share with us? Let us know on social media by tagging your photos on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram! #Zojirushi #ZoFan

 

Back to top